Days of special interest are held in Broadwell Village Hall GL56 0TL and start at 10 am. The price includes morning coffee and a cooked lunch, booking is essential

THURSDAY 26 OCTOBER 2017

Lecturer: Mark Hill

Cracking antiques: 20th century design, antiques, collecting, with a focus on glass

The antiques market has changed dramatically, pieces made in the 1970s can fetch many times more than those from the 1770s. Who’s buying what and what are they doing with it? This practical and inspirational lecture looks at furniture, ceramics, glass, lighting and metalware, identifies key designs and designers, and examines the revolutionary design movements they began.
We will look at Britain’s ‘Big Four’ post-war glass companies; Whitefriars; King’s Lynn (Wedgwood); Caithness and Dartington. The emergence of these factories is put into context and major influences behind them are discussed.
Participants are encouraged to bring any late 20th century glass and ceramics, ideally from 1950s-80s, but also 1920s-30s designs being fine. You may find out that the Midwinter dinner set from the 1960s or Dartington or Mdina glass vase from the 1970s is a hot collectable!

Cost (including coffee, lunch and tea): Members and waiting list: £32, Guests £35 Numbers are limited to 40 places

It is essential to book your place. Please send your cheques and the completed booking form by 12 October 2017 to Pamela Taylor
4 William Emes Gardens, Northwick Park, Blockley GL56 9RL
(01386 701956 dandptaylor@telecomplus.org.uk)

Mark Hill is an author, publisher, TV presenter, and the leading specialist dealer in post-war Czechoslovakian glass. Well known to The Arts Society Blockley, he is an expert on the BBC Antiques Roadshow.

THURSDAY 22 MARCH 2018

Lecturer: David Boyd Haycock

Inspiration and revolution in British art, 1890-1919 – a crisis of brilliance

1    Henry Tonks and ‘The Slade Way’: creating the ‘crisis of brilliance’ generations

2    The crisis of ‘isms’: Post-Impressionists, Cubists, Futurists, Vorticists – and more

3    Young British Artists and the Great War: the making of reputations

The students who studied at the Slade School of Art in London between 1890
and 1914 would become some of the most significant names in twentieth-century British art. They included Gwen and Augustus John, William Orpen, Percy Wyndham Lewis, Paul Nash, David Bomberg, Dora Carrington and Stanley Spencer.
They also lived through one of the most exciting and disturbing periods in European art and culture, when the traditional canons that had been established during the Renaissance were blown apart by waves of Modernism: Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Futurism and the First World War.
These three lectures explore how in the space of just a few decades the art world changed forever, and they look at some of the leading young British artists who were swept up in that revolution.

Cost (including coffee, lunch and tea): Members and waiting list: £31, Guests £34
Numbers are limited to 40 places

It is essential to book your place. Please send your cheques and the completed booking form by 8 March 2018 to Brenda Samuels
Wessington, Station Road, Blockley GL56 9DZ
(01386 701844  wessington.s@btinternet.com)

Dr David Boyd Haycock is a freelance writer and curator. He is the author of a number of books, including Paul Nash (2002/2016) and A Crisis of Brilliance: Five Young British Artists and the Great War (2009), which he turned into a major exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery in the summer of 2013.